Resources for kids

Morris is a little boy who loves using his imagination. But most of all, Morris loves wearing the tangerine dress in his classroom’s dress-up center. The children in Morris’s class don’t understand. Dresses, they say, are for girls. And Morris certainly isn’t welcome in the spaceship some of his classmates are building. Astronauts, they say, don’t wear dresses. One day when Morris feels all alone and sick from their taunts, his mother lets him stay home from school. Morris dreams of a fantastic space adventure with his cat, Moo. Inspired by his dream, Morris paints the incredible scene he saw and brings it with him to school. He builds his own spaceship, hangs his painting on the front of it and takes two of his classmates on an outer space adventure. With warm, dreamy illustrations, Isabelle Malenfant perfectly captures Morris’s vulnerability and the vibrancy of his imagination.

Do you wish to teach your child about different facets of gender diversity or do you have a family member who is transitioning? My Awesome Brother is written from a young child’s perspective when an adored older sibling is transitioning. It follows the younger child’s efforts to be supportive and the joy they both feel after the transition. It is written for children aged four and older, to start a conversation around gender diversity. It is a useful tool for families and friends of the transgender community. It can be read by people of all ages to gain an insight to the gender diverse world or read to children who are seeing gender diversity in their family or friends.

“A much-needed series of children’s books exploring gender diversity and transgender acceptance.” Julie Postance, Author of Breaking the Sound Barriers


In this heart-warming picture book, a big sister realizes that her little sister, Jackie, doesn’t like dresses or fairies-she likes ties and bugs! Will she and her family be able to accept that Jackie identifies more as “Jack”?

Susan thinks her little sister Jackie has the best giggle! She can’t wait for Jackie to get older so they can do all sorts of things like play forest fairies and be explorers together. But as Jackie grows, she doesn’t want to play those games. She wants to play with mud and be a super bug! Jackie also doesn’t like dresses or her long hair, and she would rather be called Jack.

Readers will love this sweet story about change and acceptance. This book is published in partnership with GLAAD to accelerate LGBTQ inclusivity and acceptance.

In this beautiful children’s picture book by Vivek Shraya, author of the acclaimed God Loves Hair, a five-year-old South Asian boy becomes fascinated with his mother’s bindi, the red dot commonly worn by Hindu women to indicate the point at which creation begins, and wishes to have one of his own. Rather than chastise her son, she agrees to it, and teaches him about its cultural significance, allowing the boy to discover the magic of the bindi, which in turn gives him permission to be more fully himself.

This is a story about a crayon I know.

I wrote it for you.

“I love the way this story is written and it helps so much to explain things to children in a way they can easily understand. My daughter is transgender and tried very hard to be a boy for a long time, but she just couldn’t. This is much the same way that the blue crayon tried to be red. Once everyone understood they were blue the whole time, everything was better.”

This is an illustrated children’s book for ages 7-11 that makes gender identity, sexual orientation and family diversity easy to explain to children.

Throughout the book kids learn that there are many kinds of people in the world and that diversity is something to be celebrated. It covers gender, romantic orientation, discrimination, intersectionality, privilege, and how to stand up for what’s right. With charming illustrations, clear explanations, and short sections that can be dipped in and out of, this book helps children think about how to create a kinder, more tolerant world. Published: 2019-07-18
80 pages 222 x 140mm ISBN 9781787750104

What happens when you don’t have a fairy godmother to grant your every wish? Jamie doesn’t. So she finds her own way to go to the ball. A story of determination, hard work and transition. With some clever mice and a pumpkin car, join Jamie as she becomes… Jamie.

‘A lovely, sensitive, much-needed book that helps all children ask the big questions about identity and gender.’ – Juno Dawson, author of This Book is Gay

Tiny loves costumes! Tiny likes to dress up as an animal, or a doctor, or a butterfly. Tiny also prefers not to tell other children whether they are a boy or a girl. Tiny’s friends don’t mind, but when Tiny starts a new school their new friends can’t help asking one question:

“Tiny, are you a boy or are you a girl?”

This brightly illustrated book will open a dialogue with children aged 3+ about gender diversity in a fun and creative way. Featuring a gender neutral protagonist, the book imparts an important message about identity and being who you want to be. Tiny’s story will assist parents, family and teachers in giving children the space to express themselves fully, explore different identities and have fun at the same time.

A glimpse of three women dressed as mermaids leaves one boy filled with wonder and ready to dazzle the world.

“Every choice Jessica Love makes imbues the story with charm, tenderness and humor” New York TImes Book Review

While riding the subway home with his Nana one day, Julian notices three women spectacularly dressed up. Their hair billows in brilliant hues, their dresses end in fishtails, and their joy fills the train carriage. When Julian gets home, daydreaming of the magic he’s seen, all he can think about is dressing up just like the ladies and making his own fabulous mermaid costume. But what will Nana think about the mess he makes – and even more importantly – what will she think about how Julian sees himself?

Be who you are.

When people look at George, they think they see a boy. But she knows she’s not a boy. She knows she’s a girl.

George thinks she’ll have to keep this a secret forever. Then her teacher announces that their class play is going to be Charlotte’s Web. George really, really, really wants to play Charlotte. But the teacher says she can’t even try out for the part…because she’s a boy. With the help of her best friend, Kelly, George comes up with a plan. Not just so she can be Charlotte – but so everyone can know who she is, once and for all.

In the magical time between night and day, when both the sun and the moon are in the sky, a child is born in a little blue house on a hill. And Miu Lan is not just any child, but one who can change into any shape they can imagine. The only problem is they can’t decide what to be: a boy or a girl? A flower or a shooting star? At school, though, they must endure inquisitive looks and difficult questions from the other children, and have trouble finding friends who will accept them for who they are. But they find comfort in the loving arms of their mother, who will love them just as they are.

From the time she was two years old, Jazz knew that she had a girl’s brain in a boy’s body. She loved pink and dressing up as a mermaid and didn’t feel like herself in boy’s clothing. This confused her family, until they took her to a doctor who said that Jazz was transgender and that she was born that way. Jazz’s story is based on her real-life experience and she tells it in a simple, clear way that will be appreciated by picture book readers, their parents, and teachers.

Some people are boys. Some people are girls. Some people are both, neither, or somewhere in between. This sweet, straightforward exploration of gender identity will give children a fuller understanding of themselves and others. Written by the mother of a transgender child and illustrated by a non-binary transgender artist, It Feels Good to Be Yourself provides young readers and parents alike with the vocabulary to discuss this important topic with sensitivity.

What’s the difference between sex and gender? What does it mean to be defined by your gender? Are there only two genders? This informative book helps kids to explore these questions and many more. It explains how your gender can have an impact on your life, what it means to choose your own gender identity and the importance of gender equality. Topics covered include gender stereotypes, why there are different toys for boys and girls, being intersex and transgender, cross-dressing and gender around the world.

You will also hear from a range of people who share their personal gender philosophies. Poet Anthony Anaxagorou discusses his masculinity, author Holly Bourne writes about the importance of feminism, Krishna Istha explains what it means to be genderqueer and Juno shares her experiences of being transgender. Other contributors and celebrities featured include Miley Cyrus, Lady Gaga, John Legend, Jack Monroe, Caitlyn Jenner, RuPaul, Laura Dockrill, Conchita Wurst, Andrew McMillan and Emma Watson.

Aimed at young people aged 10 and upwards.

Based on the research that race, gender, consent, and body positivity should be discussed with toddlers on up, this read-aloud board book series offers adults the opportunity to begin important conversations with young children in an informed, safe, and supported way.

Developed by experts in the fields of early childhood and activism against injustice, this topic-driven board book offers clear, concrete language and beautiful imagery that young children can grasp and adults can leverage for further discussion.

While young children are avid observers and questioners of their world, adults often shut down or postpone conversations on complicated topics because it’s hard to know where to begin. Research shows that talking about issues like race and gender from the age of two not only helps children understand what they see, but also increases self-awareness, self-esteem, and allows them to recognize and confront things that are unfair, like discrimination and prejudice.

This second book in the series begins the conversation on gender, with a supportive approach that considers both the child and the adult. Stunning art accompanies the simple and interactive text, and the backmatter offers additional resources and ideas for extending this discussion.

Moonbeam Children’s Book Awards Gold Medal Winner

This is an illustrated children’s book for ages 7-11 that makes gender identity, sexual orientation and family diversity easy to explain to children.

Throughout the book kids learn that there are many kinds of people in the world and that diversity is something to be celebrated. It covers gender, romantic orientation, discrimination, intersectionality, privilege, and how to stand up for what’s right. With charming illustrations, clear explanations, and short sections that can be dipped in and out of, this book helps children think about how to create a kinder, more tolerant world.

Simple, accessible, and direct, this picture book is perfect for kids and parents or teachers to read together, opening the door to conversations about gender stereotypes and everyone’s right to be their true selves.

Is it okay for boys to cry? Can girls be strong? Should girls and boys be given different toys to play with and different clothes to wear? Should we all feel free to love whoever we choose to love? In this incredibly kid-friendly and easy-to-grasp picture book, author-illustrator Elise Gravel and transgender collaborator Mykaell Blais raise these questions and others relating to gender roles, acceptance, and stereotyping.

With its simple language, colorful illustrations, engaging backmatter that showcases how appropriate male and female fashion has changed through history, and even a poster kids can hang on their wall, here is the ideal tool to help in conversations about a multi-layered and important topic.

Jacob loves playing dress-up, when he can be anything he wants to be. Some kids at school say he can’t wear girl clothes, but Jacob wants to wear a dress to school. Can he convince his parents to let him wear what he wants? This heart-warming story speaks to the unique challenges faced by children who don’t identify with traditional gender roles.

Dyson loves the colour pink and sparkly things. Sometimes he wears dresses and sometimes he wears jeans. He likes to wear his princess tiara, even when climbing trees. He’s a Princess Boy, and his family loves him exactly the way he is. This is a story about love and acceptance. It is also a call for tolerance and an end to bullying and judgments. Inspired by the author’s son, and by her own initial struggles to understand, this is a heart-warming book about unconditional love and one remarkable family.

“A fun lesson for all in letting children express themselves freely” – Mermaids.

The book follows the story of a boy, who would love to be able to wear a tutu and dance without feeling judged. Getting a visit from a tutu-loving space boy makes him realise that his “rainbow light” is needed on Earth. 

100% of profits from the sale of the book will go to Mermaids (charity)

This book also provides child-friendly information on gender diversity and gender expression, beautifully illustrated by Karolina Piotrowska. There is even a full, framed page reserved for your child to draw themselves.

Only available via this link:
79937/hardback-mermaids-special-edition/

Alex and Alex have lots of things in common. They love playing, and dressing up and building things. They also are very different to one another; Alex is very messy and Alex is very tidy, Alex likes running and kicking a ball and Alex likes reading and dreaming. After a trip to the museum goes a little bit awry, Alex and Alex have some cooling off time. But they always make up because Alex really really really really really really REALLY…. likes Alex!

This is a book for very young readers introducing ideas of gender neutrality and tolerance of difference. Neither character is identified as a boy or a girl, and the activities that each one enjoys is a mix of traditional ‘boy’ and ‘girl’ things. Charming, stripped back illustration illuminates the shared human experience and is also accessible to children ages 2 and up.

In this honest, accessible illustrated guide to how babies are made, young readers can find out exactly what is needed to grow a baby, from introducing the basic building blocks of life such as sperm and eggs, to explaining the different ways that these building blocks can be put together to create a family.

Working closely with a leading national LGBT organisation, this inclusive guide to Making a Baby covers sex, sperm and egg donation, IUI, IVF, surrogacy and adoption, as well as explaining how a baby grows in the womb and about different kinds of births. Written in gentle and accessible language that can be shared with younger children or read alone by confident readers, we hope this book and its clear illustrations will provide the stepping stone for every parent to have an open conversation with their child about how babies are made, and their family began.

Frank, friendly and funny, the Trans Teen Survival Guide will leave transgender and non-binary teens informed, empowered and armed with all the tips, confidence and practical advice they need to navigate life as a trans teen.

Wondering how to come out to your family and friends, what it’s like to go through cross hormonal therapy or how to put on a packer? Trans youth activists Fox and Owl have stepped in to answer everything that trans teens and their families need to know.

With a focus on self-care, expression and being proud of your unique identity, the guide is packed full of invaluable advice from people who understand the realities and complexities of growing up trans. Having been there, done that, Fox and Owl are able to honestly chart the course of life as a trans teen, from potentially life-saving advice on dealing with dysphoria or depression, to hilarious real-life awkward trans stories.

Discover what it means to be a young transgender or non-binary person in the 21st century in this frank and funny guide for 14+ teens, from the author of This Book Is Gay

In What’s the T?, Stonewall ambassador, best-selling trans author and former PSHE teacher Juno Dawson defines a myriad of labels and identities and offers uncensored advice on coming out, sex and relationships with her trademark humour and lightness of touch. Juno has also invited her trans and non-binary friends to make contributions, ensuring this inclusive book reflects as many experiences as possible and features the likes of Travis Alabanza and Jay Hulme. 

The companion title to the groundbreaking This Book Is GayWhat’s the T? tackles the complex realities of growing up trans with honesty and humour and is joyfully illustrated by gender non-conforming artist Soofiya.